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Andy Kindler’s net worth, biography, fact, career, awards and life story

Net Worth: $1 Million
Date of Birth: Oct 16, 1956 (66 years old)
Gender: Male
Height: 5 ft 7 in (1.702 m)
Profession: Actor, Comedian
Nationality: United States of America

What Is Andy Kindler’s Net Worth?

Andy Kindler is an American comedian, actor, and producer who has a net worth of $1 million. Andy Kindler is known for comedy that often roasts the stand-up industry and his fellow comics. Andy has released the stand-up comedy albums “I Wish I Was Bitter” (2010) and “Hence the Humor” (2020), and he produced the “I Wish I Was Bitter” comedy special, which was released in 2014. Kindler has more than 40 acting credits to his name, including the films “Who’s the Caboose?” (1997) and “The Fiddling Horse” (2020) and the television series “Everybody Loves Raymond” (1996–2005), “Raising Dad” (2001–2002), “Significant Others” (2004), “Wizards of Waverly Place” (2009–2012), “Maron” (2013–2016), and “I’m Dying Up Here” (2018). Andy has voiced Mort on the animated Fox series “Bob’s Burgers” since 2011, and he has lent his voice to “The Bob’s Burgers Movie” (2022) and the TV shows “Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist” (1995–1997), “The Dick & Paula Celebrity Special” (1999), “Home Movies” (2002–2004), “The Life & Times of Tim” (2011), and “Harvey Beaks” (2015–2016). Andy also co-hosts the podcast “Thought Spiral” with comedian J. Elvis Weinstein.

Early Life

Andy Kindler was born on October 16, 1956, in Queens, New York. Andy grew up in a Jewish household, and his mother became a Quaker when he was 15. Sadly, Kindler’s mother and sister passed away within a few weeks of each other in the late 2010s. Before he decided to pursue comedy, Andy initially wanted a career as a classical musician. Kindler graduated from Binghamton University in 1978, and as a college student, he appeared in theatrical productions. Andy moved to Los Angeles after college, and he first performed stand-up comedy in 1984.

Stand-Up Comedy Career

Kindler has performed at the Montréal Just for Laughs Festival many times, and he delivers the festival’s annual “State of the Industry” address. In the ’90s, Andy appeared on “The 15th Annual Young Comedians Special,” “An Evening at the Improv,” “Comic Cabana,” “Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” and “The Daily Show.” In 2003, he recorded “I Wish I Was Bitter,” which was released as an album and a special/DVD years later. In 2010, Kindler served as a judge on the NBC competition series “Last Comic Standing,” and he hosted Hulu’s “Coming to the Stage” from 2016 to 2017. In 2020, he released his second album, “Hence the Humor.”

Acting Career

Andy made his acting debut in a 1993 episode of “Martin,” then he guest-starred on “Muddling Through” (1994), “The Larry Sanders Show” (1995), and “Ellen” (1997). He appeared in the 1995 TV movies “Favorite Deadly Sins” and “The TV Wheel,” and his first feature film was 1997’s “Who’s the Caboose?,” which also starred stand-up comics such as Sarah Silverman, Todd Barry, Marc Maron, and David Cross. From 1996 to 2005, Kindler played Andy on the CBS sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” which won two Primetime Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series. From 2001 to 2002, he co-starred with Bob Saget, Kat Dennings, Brie Larson, and Meagan Good on The WB series “Raising Dad,” and in 2004, he had a recurring role on the Bravo sitcom “Significant Others.”  From 2009 to 2012, Andy played Chancellor Tootietootie in six episodes of the Disney Channel series “Wizards of Waverly Place,” and he portrayed a fictionalized version of himself on the IFC sitcom “Maron” from 2013 to 2016. He guest-starred on “‘Til Death” (2010), “Crash & Bernstein” (2013), “The Neighbors” (2014), “Garfunkel and Oates” (2014), “Sirens” (2015), “Lady Dynamite” (2016), “Another Period” (2018), and “Portlandia” (2018), and he had a recurring role as Morris on Showtime’s “I’m Dying Up Here” in 2018. In 2020, Kindler appeared in the film “The Fiddling Horse.”

Personal Life

Andy married Susan Maljan on May 26, 2002. During a 2022 appearance on “The New Abnormal” podcast, Kindler spoke about cancel culture and Louis C.K. (who admitted to sexual misconduct in 2017), stating, “There is that thing where the whole world comes down on you with shaming culture. I do think that people can make mistakes and they can apologize for the mistake. But the things that upset me are where they aren’t mistakes. For example, I’ve been arguing for the whole last week about Louis C.K. and all these people argue that he apologized and he took responsibility. This is just false.” Andy added that Louis “is an extremely manipulative, ambitious person who always came off like, ‘I’m not ambitious. I’m not this way.’ There’s nobody who wanted to be more famous than Louis C.K.”